Con Houlihan

Con Houlihan

Con Houlihan

Con Houlihan ~ Bronze
Sculptor ~ Unknown to me.

Con Houlihan was one of Ireland’s premier sportswriters. He was often described as ‘writer, journalist, philosopher, raconteur, Gaelic scholar and gentleman, he entertained his readers with some fantastic writing.

Con looks like a man with a thirst!

Con looks like a man with a thirst!

This sculpture was erected in the vestibule of The Bank Bar & Restaurant on College Green, in Dublin.

Bank Bar & Restaurant

Bank Bar & Restaurant

In a brief eulogy at the end of the funeral service, Ray Hennessy, a friend of the journalist, described Con Houlihan (1925 – 2012) as:

A sculptor of language” who was “sensitive, compassionate, humourous, sometimes extremely funny, courteous, with perfect manners.”

He recalled a comment he made when unable to locate a book of poetry by Gerald Manley Hopkins after a cleaning lady had done her work, “you know, if that woman worked in Trinity College she’d throw out the Book of Kells”.

On another occasion, when Kerry unexpectedly beat Dublin in football he was asked how his friend Harriet, a dedicated Dublin supporter, was taking it, “Con replied ‘House private. No flowers’.”

There was no signature or sculptor’s name on the work and I have been unsuccessful in my search for further information.

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Old Oak

Old Oak

Old Oak

Old Oak ~ Bronze
Sculptor ~ Michael McWilliams

I found this piece last July, as I wandered through the Westbury Mall adjacent to the Westbury Hotel, just off Grafton Street in Dublin.

Old oak_2Michael McWilliams was born and educated in Dublin. He has been working as a professional artist for 30 years. He works from his studio on the foothills of the Dublin Mountains.

Old oak_3

While his main interest is landscape painting, using a palette of tones and hues inspired by nature, he also works with bronze focusing mainly on the human form.

Old oak_4

His works are in various corporate and private collections in Ireland and abroad.

The Onion Seller

The Onion Seller

The Onion Seller

The Onion Seller ~ Bronze
Sculptor ~ Séamus Murphy (1907-1975)

This is a monument to the women dealers in the Coal Quay, Cork City Open Market.

The Onion Seller-2

It was erected on February 27th 1986 and unveiled on February 28th 1986 by the Lord Mayor, Alderman Dan Wallace TD as a gift to the City of Cork to commemorate Cork 800 by Sunbeam Wolsey PLC.

Séamus Murphy was born at Greenhill, Burnfort, Mallow, Co Cork.

The Echo Boy

The Echo Boy

The Echo Boy

The Echo Boy ~ Bronze
Sculptor ~ Barry Moloney

This memorial is for the Echo Boys.

Poor and often homeless children who sold the newspaper The Evening Echo & on the streets in Cork City.

Evening Echo newspapers for sale

Evening Echo newspapers for sale

Barry Moloney (1935 – 1992) was principal of the Crawford School of Art. Unfortunately, I had little success in finding information about Barry Moloney.

Plaque on the wall behind the Echo Boy.

Plaque on the wall behind the Echo Boy.

“The Echo Boy”
Commemorating
150 years of
The Cork Examiner
And 100 years of the
Evening Echo

The sculpture was
Unveiled 8 December 1991 by
Councillor Denis (Dino) Cregan
Lord Mayor of Cork

Barry Moloney
Sculptor

Relocated from Cook Street to
Saint Patrick’s Street 2004

Special offer today.

Today, like all the best Supermarkets I offer two for the price of one!

Theobald Wolfe Tone 1763-1798

Theobald Wolfe Tone
1763-1798

Theobald Wolfe Tone ~ Bronze
Sculptor ~ Edward Delaney

As you approach St Stephen’s Green from the North East Corner A large sculpture of Theobald Wolfe Tone (1763 – 1798) stands guard today. Commonly known as Wolfe Tone, he was one of the founding members of the United Irishmen and is regarded as the father of Irish republicanism.

Cyclists resting at the feet of the father of Irish republicanism. I wonder what they are scheming?

Cyclists resting at the feet of the father of Irish republicanism. I wonder what they are scheming?

When you walk round the stone pillars the other side tells a very different story:

Hungry Heart Famine memorial  ~Edward Delaney

Hungry Heart Famine memorial
~Edward Delaney

Hungry Heart Famine memorial ~ Bronze
Sculptor ~Edward Delaney

Hungry Heart: Edward Delaney‘s “Famine Memorial”

The two parts are all one sculpture and you can read more about them in this obituary for Edward Delaney from The Guardian in 2009

This eight-minute video on Dublin, Ireland’s St. Stephen’s Green and sculptor Edward Delaney’s “Famine Memorial” (1967) gives more information.

Back on August I featured the work of Edward Delaney, with his piece Four Angels.

PROTOGONOS

PROTOGONOS-1

PROTOGONOS-1

PROTOGONOS ~ Bronze
Sculptor ~ Eamonn O’Doherty

This sculpture, in polished and patinated bronze, combines the symbol of medicine, the Rod of Aesculapius and its coiled serpents, with the laurel wreath of Hygieia, mythological goddess of health, and the double helix of the DNA.

PROTOGONOS-2

PROTOGONOS-2

The work is dedicated to the countless men, women and children who have occupied the various institutions on this site during the last three hundred years, and celebrates the evolution of the modern St. James’s Hospital.

PROTOGONOS-4

PROTOGONOS-4

Eamonn O’Doherty was born in Derry in 1939 and studied at University College Dublin, earning a degree in architecture. Later he became lecturer at the Department of Architecture at the Dublin Institute of Technology. In various capacities he also taught on the Dún Laoghaire College of Art and Design(Ireland), the Ecole Speciale d’Architecture in Paris (France), Harvard University (USA), University of Nebraska (USA) and the University of Jordan (Jordan)

He was responsible for some of the best-loved works of public art in the Republic – including the Quincentennial Sculpture in Galway’s Eyre Square, the James Connolly Memorial across from Dublin’s Liberty Hall and the Anna Livia fountain (aka ‘the floozie in the Jacuzzi), which was relocated from O’Connell Street to Croppy Acre Memorial Park near Heuston Station.

I have in the past featured Swans a work by Eamonn, alas, my old blog is down right now and I am unable to give you a working link.

Tagore

Bust of Nobel Prize winning poet, Rabindranath Tagore in St Stephen's Green Dublin, Ireland.

Bust of Nobel Prize winning poet, Rabindranath Tagore in St Stephen’s Green Dublin, Ireland.

Rabindranath Tagore ~ Bronze
Artist ~ Unknown.

This bust of the Indian nationalist and Nobel Prize winning poet “GURUDEV” Rabindranath Tagore, was unveiled on the 17th October 2011 to mark the 150th anniversary of his birth.

The bust was unveiled at St. Stephen’s Green by Mr. Eamon Gilmore, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Republic of Ireland. & Mrs. Prennet Kaur, Minister of State for External Affairs. India. This is the first Non-Irish statue unveiled in Stephen’s Green Park.

Irish Poet W. B. Yeats was his close friend and who translated Gitanjali into English.

Rabindranath Tagore was a great poet, author and had made an immense contribution to Indian literature and music. He became the first non-European Nobel laureate by earning the 1913 Prize in Literature.

 “Clouds come floating into my life, no longer to carry rain or usher storm, but to add colour to my sunset sky.”

Verse 292, Stray Birds, 1916.

Below is an English translation of the final poem written by Tagore just two weeks before he died.

“I’m lost in the middle of my birthday.
I want my friends,
their touch,
with the earth’s last love.
I will take life’s final offering,
I will take the human’s last blessing.
Today my sack is empty.
I have given completely
whatever I had to give.
In return if I receive anything –
some love, some forgiveness –
then I will take it with me
when I step on the boat that crosses
to the festival of the wordless end.”