The Onion Seller

The Onion Seller

The Onion Seller

The Onion Seller ~ Bronze
Sculptor ~ Séamus Murphy (1907-1975)

This is a monument to the women dealers in the Coal Quay, Cork City Open Market.

The Onion Seller-2

It was erected on February 27th 1986 and unveiled on February 28th 1986 by the Lord Mayor, Alderman Dan Wallace TD as a gift to the City of Cork to commemorate Cork 800 by Sunbeam Wolsey PLC.

Séamus Murphy was born at Greenhill, Burnfort, Mallow, Co Cork.

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Today, like all the best Supermarkets I offer two for the price of one!

Theobald Wolfe Tone 1763-1798

Theobald Wolfe Tone
1763-1798

Theobald Wolfe Tone ~ Bronze
Sculptor ~ Edward Delaney

As you approach St Stephen’s Green from the North East Corner A large sculpture of Theobald Wolfe Tone (1763 – 1798) stands guard today. Commonly known as Wolfe Tone, he was one of the founding members of the United Irishmen and is regarded as the father of Irish republicanism.

Cyclists resting at the feet of the father of Irish republicanism. I wonder what they are scheming?

Cyclists resting at the feet of the father of Irish republicanism. I wonder what they are scheming?

When you walk round the stone pillars the other side tells a very different story:

Hungry Heart Famine memorial  ~Edward Delaney

Hungry Heart Famine memorial
~Edward Delaney

Hungry Heart Famine memorial ~ Bronze
Sculptor ~Edward Delaney

Hungry Heart: Edward Delaney‘s “Famine Memorial”

The two parts are all one sculpture and you can read more about them in this obituary for Edward Delaney from The Guardian in 2009

This eight-minute video on Dublin, Ireland’s St. Stephen’s Green and sculptor Edward Delaney’s “Famine Memorial” (1967) gives more information.

Back on August I featured the work of Edward Delaney, with his piece Four Angels.

The Three Fates

The Three Fates St. Stephens Green, Dublin

The Three Fates
St. Stephens Green, Dublin

The Three Fates ~ Bronze
Sculptor ~ Professor Josef Wackerle

The fountain is situated near the Leeson Street entrance to St. Stephens Green, Dublin, Ireland. It consists of a group of three bronze figures – representing the Three Fates, who weave and measure the thread of man’s destiny.

The Three Fates  St. Stephens Green, Dublin

The Three Fates
St. Stephens Green, Dublin

The statue was a gift offered by Roman Herzog, President of the Federal Republic of Germany at the time.

The Three Fates (3) St. Stephens Green, Dublin

The Three Fates (3)
St. Stephens Green, Dublin

The engraving on the plaque is in German, Irish and English:

German: In Dankbarkeit für die Hilfe, die das irische Volk deutschen Kindern nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg gewährte

Irish: Le buíochas as an gcabhair a thug muintir na hÉireann do pháistí Gearmánacha tar éis an Dara Cogadh Domhanda

English: With gratitude for the help given to German children by the Irish people after World War II.

Photographing the Alphabet ~ V

V ~ Viaduct

I have a couple of photos that I may well have shared in the past, but the viaduct the other day was far to close to the busy road I was travelling on. I didn’t want to risk my life or be a hazard to others, in the  heavy traffic so kept on driving.

Viaduct carrying the train line from Belfast to Dublin

Viaduct carrying the train line from Belfast to Dublin

This photo was was taken in May 2010 through the car window as I was stopped in road works traffic. The work was nearing completion on the last stretch of motorway from Belfast to Dublin and cutting out the last of the bottlenecks on the journey.

Another stretch of the same railway line at the end of March 2013

Another stretch of the same railway line at the end of March 2013

Photo taken at the end of March 2013. This time it was mid morning and the traffic was light so I pulled over to the hard shoulder to take this shot. You can just about see Newry through the arches.

Newry is a city in Northern Ireland that straddles the border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.  It is 34 miles from Belfast and 67 miles from Dublin.

Moving on to Randalstown….

A 19th century viaduct built to extend the railway system in County Antrim.

A 19th century viaduct built to extend the railway system in County Antrim.

This Charles Lanyon designed viaduct was built in 1856 to extend the railway from Randalstown to Cookstown. There are two levels the upper one was the train line and the lower the road from Randalstown to Antrim Town.

Approaching from the Main Street.

Approaching from the Main Street.

In 1830 Randalstown was described as ” chiefly one street extending for half a mile along the road from Toomebridge to Belfast..”

I once heard that the area was also called: a “potwalloping borough”, this meant that anyone who boiled a pot of yarn was entitled to vote…. I think they really earned that voting right!

Disused railway bridge leading to the Viaduct

Disused railway bridge, now a pathway leading to the Viaduct with the entrance to Shane’s Castle on the right.

In the late 1990’s the top of the viaduct and part of the railway track were converted into a walkway and cycle path leading from Station Road to New Street. This development provides views of Randalstown, the River Maine and the adjoining parkland of Shane’s Castle.

Entrance to Shane's Castle, Randalstown

Entrance to Shane’s Castle, Randalstown

The entrance to the Shane’s castle Estate

Looking across the town from the Viaduct pathway

By the end of the 19th century the town depended on an iron works and the Old Bleach Linen Company which was established here in 1864. All that remains now is the chimney of the mill which you can see in the photo above. At its peak in the 1930’s, the Old Bleach company employed over 1000 people. Its doors finally closed in 1980 and demolition began in 1994.

Damask table linen made in Ireland graced tables all over the world in a bygone era of elegance and leisure. I wonder how many of you across the globe have a family heirloom lurking in a drawer?

Four Angels

Four Angels Fountain_1

Four Angels Fountain ~ Bronze
Sculptor ~ Edward Delaney

Four Angels Fountain_2

The Four Angels Fountain at College Green, Dublin, Ireland, is a secondary piece to the Davis Memorial. The statue of Davis, was unveiled on College Green, Dublin, in 1966.

Four Angels Fountain_9

Designed by Edward Delaney and known locally as the ‘peeing angels’, the fountain in memory of Thomas Davis depicts trumpeting Heralds of the Four Provinces proclaiming one of Davis’s best-known poems A Nation Again. The surrounding tablets illustrate harrowing scenes from the Great Famine of the 1840s. 

A Nation Once Again was first published in The Nation on 13 July 1844 and quickly became a rallying call for the growing Irish nationalist movement at that time.

Four Angels Fountain_3

This site was previously occupied by an equestrian statue of William III. That monument was blown up six times before being completely destroyed by a bomb in 1946. The wreck was taken to a corporation yard and the horses huge lead testicles were melted down and used to repair a pipe.

Four Angels Fountain_8

In the background is the Bank of Ireland formerly known as the Irish Parliament House, was the world’s first purpose-built two-chamber parliament house.

The fountain is a great favorite of students, who regularly ‘clean up’ the angels with the addition of dish washing liquid!

Four Angels Fountain_10

A very special day

It was time for lunch. Not just any old lunch, but a catch up with Brian – He who gave me the handle Grannymar. Calendars were checked. Dates discussed, arranged, postponed and finally organised for the week before he returned to ‘La Heredia’. I knew I would be going to Dublin, so decided to travel a few days early and have our lunch there instead of Belfast.

I asked if he knew where the Hungry tree was, it was on my list to photograph.

He did. One thing led to another and before I knew it lunch became a day of adventure for me.

I was collected at 11 am and traveled in style to see the Hungry tree.

The hungry tree

The hungry tree

The seat has been there so long, the tree has grown over the back of it.

Hungry tree from another angle

Hungry tree from another angle

We then continued up the drive to the front door of our next port of call…

The Honorable Society of King’s Inns

The Honorable Society of King’s Inns

The Honorable Society of King’s Inns is the oldest institution of legal education in Ireland. The Honorable Society of King’s Inns comprises benchers, barristers and students. The benchers include all the judges of the Supreme and High Courts and a number of elected barristers.

Gateway to my adventure

Gateway to my adventure

It was founded in 1541 during the reign of Henry VIII, who had passed the Act for confiscation of Religious Houses in 1539, and granted the Society the lands and properties on which the Four Courts now stand but which were then occupied by a Dominican monastery.

The Lobby

The Lobby

When the Four Courts were built in the 1790s, King’s Inns moved to Constitution Hill and the benchers commissioned James Gandon to design their present property, the headquarters of the Benchers and the School of Law. The primary focus of the school is the training of barristers.

Looking up from the window

Looking up from the window

In the Middle Ages, the need for apprentice lawyers to learn about common law led to the founding of hostels where they could live and study. The Inns of Court were places where the students were provided with accommodation, meals and tuition. Up to 1800 the buildings at Inns Quay provided all that was needed for practice at the bar. There were chambers where barristers lived and worked, a hall for eating and drinking, a library for research, a chapel for prayer and gardens for recreation. Things changed somewhat with the move to Constitution Hill. Chambers and a chapel were to have been built but the plans were never executed. However, many of the 17th century traditions remain or are co-mingled with 21st century developments.

The Dining Hall

The Dining Hall

The formal records of King’s Inns (the “Black Book”) date from 1607. Initially a voluntary society but by 1634 membership had become compulsory for barristers wishing to practise in the courts.

Nolumus Mutari

Nolumus Mutari

The fireplace in the dining hall with the King’s Inns seal. An open book and the motto Nolumus Mutari which is commonly translated as ‘we do not wish to be changed’. It should be read and understood as the determination by the bench and the bar that the law will be applied without fear or favour and will not bend to suit interests of those with power and influence.

Some of the paintings in the dining hall

Some of the paintings in the dining hall

After the Williamite wars of the 1690s catholics were effectively excluded from the legal profession by the penal laws. This exclusion lasted for a century until the Catholic Relief Act of 1792 when catholics were allowed to practise at the outer Bar.

The gong to announce dinner

The gong to announce dinner

King’s Inns did not possess a library until in 1787 but on the death of Mr. Justice Robinson, his law books (at that time valued at £700) were bought by the Society.

The reading room

The reading room

The present library building was erected between 1826 and 1830, to a design by Frederick Darley. The Library has three stories over a basement and was originally seven bays wide. In 1892 an annexe was added at the north-west end.

View of the gallery

View of the gallery

A Copyright Act of 1710 required that printers give a copy of each book published to various university libraries in England and Scotland. During the reign of George III, in a further Copyright Act (1801), the libraries of Trinity College, Dublin and of King’s Inns were added to the list. In 1836 the provisions of the act were withdrawn.

Detail of the plasterwork

Detail of the plasterwork

The present library building was completed in 1830 and houses some 100,000 volumes including those which formed the original collection, purchased in 1787.

Not your usual light reading

Not your usual light reading

Today the library contains over 110,000 volumes, about half of which have a legal content, the remainder being concerned with a wide variety of non-legal subjects.

Nolumus Mutari

well read weighty words

The general collection contains works on art, history, the classics, literature, biography and numerous other subjects. Of particular note are the books printed before 1501, parliamentary papers, Encumbered Estates Court Rentals, pamphlets and manuscripts.

Throwing light on the subject

Throwing light on the subject

While in the past the Society sought to create a comprehensive general library, the emphasis in recent years has been on developing the legal collection. The legal collection contains all of the Irish and most of the English textbooks along with statutes, reports of cases, digests and legal periodicals. European, Commonwealth and American Law are well represented and amongst the older legal material are fine collections of trials, Irish appeals to the House of Lords, nominate reports, Roman law and canon law.

I walked all the way down and. up again, but didn't  count them.

I walked all the way down and. up again, but didn’t count them.

We went all the way down stairs to where we found bound copies of The  Times from long before I or my parents were born.

Bound copies of The Times newspapers

Bound copies of The Times newspapers

I was privileged to be allowed into the inner sanctum of the bencher’s room. A place for the learned gentlemen to unwind and discuss the matters of the day.

Inner sanctum for the benchers

Inner sanctum for the benchers

Some decorative details:

decorative ceiling detail

decorative ceiling detail

ceiling light

ceiling light

Ceiling rose

Ceiling rose

One surprise was a garderobe:

a garderobe

a garderobe

A modern soap dish, toilet roll & loo brush are evidence to the fact it was still in use today. I have to say I love the towel holder.

classy towel holder

classy towel holder

That towel holder looks like a heavy door knocker. I like it!

The whole visit was a wonderful experience and I must say a special thanks to David, who with Brian made the visit so memorable.

Gallery 1

Gallery 2

gallery 3 Miscellaneous selection of photos:

We did go and have a late lunch at Aqua in Howth. The company, the food and the view were all fantastic. A pet day!

St. Annes Park

St. Anne’s Park is an estate of nearly 306 acres in the Clontarf/Raheny area, on the north side of Dublin. Brothers Arthur and Benjamin Lee Guinness (sons of Uncle Arthur, the man who gave us the black stuff!), built up and called the estate St. Anne’s after the Holy Well of the same name on the lands.

St Anne's Park, Clontarf. Who would believe this was the site of a great battle in 1014?

St Anne’s Park, Clontarf. Who would believe this was the site of a great battle in 1014?

In 1932 the estate was sold to Dublin Corporation and still remains in their hands.

St Anne's Park_3

In December 1943, the main residence of St. Anne’s “The Mansion” was gutted by a fire and the ruins demolished in 1968. In the meantime, just over 200 acres of the estate were developed for public housing with the central most attractive portion comprising about 270 acres retained as parkland.

St Anne's Park_5

The park is intensively used by the public through its 35 playing pitches, 18 hard-surfaced tennis courts, 4 Boules courts and a par-3 golf course. The park also has a remote-controlled model car track, and a dedicated ‘Dog Park’ beside the track, where dogs may be let off lead at all other times.

Each year, an annual Rose Festival is held in the Park on the 3rd weekend of July.

A modern addition.  I have no details of the sculptor or title of the piece.

A modern addition. I have no details of the sculptor or title of the piece.

In the Central Nurseries, located behind the Clocktower Gardens, over 600,000 seasonal bedding plants are produced annually for the city’s parks. The wooden planters to be seen on the Liffey Boardwalk and elsewhere throughout the city, along with the tiered floral planters, are also produced & maintained within the Nursery.

Photo is the property of Dublin City Council.

Photo is the property of Dublin City Council.

The Red Stables designed by George Coppinger Ashlin, have been refurbished and now provide an Arts Centre, Restaurant & a Saturday Farmers Market.

On our way to the Farmer's Market.

On our way to the Farmer’s Market.

The avenue leading to the market.

This cut down tree stump fascinated me.

This cut down tree stump fascinated me.

Another view of the cut down tree stump, remember the roots are still in the ground.

side view of the tree stump

side view of the tree stump

…. and from the front:

Front view shows a seat!

Front view shows a seat!

Finally a well seasoned stump seat:

well seasoned seat

Click on any thumbnail in the gallery below for greater detail.