Grey hair and wrinkles

Well, as you know I accept and embrace my greying hair & wrinkles, they are part of the person I am.

I must tell you a funny story.

Several months ago, before the weather turned cold, I was out for a walk. Casually dressed in my skinny jeans and boots, with a fitted little jacket over the top, the sunshine warmed my soul and I skipped along to the sound of salsa music drifting from an open window. I became aware of a manly footfall behind me. It seemed to move in step with me for several minutes.

Eventually the man, about fifty, moved to pass me by, as he did so he glanced in my direction, and the look of surprised shock was evident. What he saw from the front did not seem to fit with his image of me from the back! I winked, and grinned, to let him know I knew what he was thinking! 😉  He smiled and walked on.

Yes, my face is stamped with laughter lines and the hair that frames my face has assumed the glow of natural hi-lights.

Hell, grey hair is better than no hair at all, and it keeps my head warm. To see the real me, you need to look into my eyes, we are after all told that: ‘The eyes are the window to the soul’ and souls are ageless.

The Marriage of….

MARRIAGE OF MR JOHN MOLONY AND MISS KENNY

The marriage of J Molony and Miss Kenny took place on 30th January when the lonely surroundings of Coolmeen were enlivened by a gay wedding party. The ceremony was performed by Rev D Courtney, PP and Mr Martin Moloney cousin of the bridegroom was best man. The bride, youngest daughter of the late Daniel Kenny Coolmeen, was given away by her brother and looked charming in a biscuit coloured dress trimmed with chiffon and roses.

Miss Roche, Ennis, and Miss Mary Reidy, Boloughera were bridesmaids and were tastefully dressed in fawn colour cloth with hats to match. The wedding party were met at Kildysart by a number of young men bearing torch lights who headed the procession through the village. The guests were entertained at the home of Mr Moloney (Martin).

Unusual wording for this day and age?

The above report appeared in the Clare Journal on Monday 12th February 1900. The wedding took place one hundred and fourteen (114) years ago today.

Coolmeen is a townland in County Clare, Ireland. It is located on the north bank of the Shannon Estuary 7 kms (3.5 Irish miles) to the south west of Kildysart.

Modern road sign at the  cross roads

Modern road sign at the cross roads

Why my interest?

1. Mr John Molony and his bride with no first name were my paternal grandparents!She did actually have a first name: Margaret. She was the daughter of Daniel Kenny and Bridget Kelly. The Kenny’s were part of the reason for my auburn hair!

2. The different spellings of the name Molony/Moloney.
They were correct. John Molony & Martin Moloney were in fact double cousins, each related through both of their parents.** Years later my father served his time as a draper’s assistant to Martin Moloney & Sons, Textile Specialists.

3. The description of the outfits worn by the bride and bridesmaids.

Can you imagine any bridesmaid or flower girl today, being described as ‘tastefully dressed in fawn colour CLOTH’! Jen, Triona and Alice, I am looking at you three in particular! 😆

The giddy goose of my inner crafting eye is visualising the Misses Roche & Reidy, wrapped mummy fashion from a large bail of fawn cloth as sold by Martin Moloney & Sons! Do you think they got a discount. 😉

Bale of cloth

Bale of cloth

Let me take you back before this date in 1900……

It was in March 1878 that John was appointed Postmaster of Kildysart.

Besides running the Post office, John became:

  • Registrar of Births, Marriages and Deaths
  • Travel Agent for all the Trans Atlantic shipping lines
  • Insurance Agent,
  • The Inspector of Gunpowder and Gun Licenses.
  • An Import/Export Agent
  • He opened a grocery/bar, so stamps and postal orders were sold at one counter and groceries & liquor at the one opposite.

My grandfather was the man who anyone wishing to emigrate to America or England, went to for his or her Identification Papers.

Mind you, “The Licensing Act of 1872 forbade anyone to be drunk while in charge of a cow or steam engine on a public highway”. I wonder how that effected business on a Fair Day?

1907 Molony Family at Post office

1907 Molony Family at Post office

John & Margaret Molony with the first five of their eleven children, outside the Post Office in 1907. The babe in arms dressed like a doll, was in fact John. Sure ’tis no wonder he ran off to America in 1925! No. I don’t think he was wearing dresses when he went! 😉

John later extended his portfolio, as we say today, by buying a small farm – he had a large family to feed and rear, and the boys took their turn at bringing home the cows for milking and taking them back to the fields before and after school each day.

My grandmother worked in the shop as well as keeping hens, geese & a goat. I think a couple of pigs were under her charge too!

In the early 1900s there were many businesses and trades in Kildysart: saddlers, shoemakers, nailmakers, dressmakers, milliners, blacksmiths, tailors and millers. Alas, most of these no longer exist.

Moving forward to 1942/3 the following description of the Kildysert area is interesting.

Considered a quiet village in today’s world, Kildysart has minimarkets, hardware shops, a bank, pharmacist, clinic, veterinary clinic, credit union, garage, RC church, Community Centre, Quay Marina and seven pubs. Alas no mention of the Post Office.

The post office is now McMahon’s Chemist Shop, a name mentioned in the 1942 link above

The Post Office is now a Chemists shop

The Post Office is now a Chemists shop

*Not alone were they my grandparents, but there were many similarities unknowingly repeated in my life.

**This double spelling surfaced again in the next generation. My father, Dan Molony married my mother – Eileen Moloney, although she was born in Dublin, her paternal Moloney ancestors came from Murroe in County Limerick, across the mouth of the River Shannon from Kildysart County Clare.
The double cousins have come into play for some of my nieces and nephews, since two of my brothers married two sisters.

Thursday Special ~ Punny world

Paul started a new job in Seoul last week. He thought it was a good Korea move.

Statistically, 6 out of 7 dwarves are not Happy.

The “rocket salad” I bought went off before I could eat it!

I was driving this morning when I saw an AA van. The driver was sobbing and looked miserable. I thought, “that guy’s heading for a breakdown.”

A wife says to her husband, “you’re always pushing me around and talking behind my back.” He says, “what do you expect? You’re in a wheelchair.”

My daughter asked me for a spider for her birthday. At the pet shop, they were £70! “Blow this,” I thought, “I can get one cheaper off the web.”

My neighbour knocked on my door at 2:30 this morning! Can you believe that? Lucky for him I was still up playing my Bagpipes.

19 mates go to the cinema. The ticket lady exclaims, “So many of you!” Mick nods, “The film said 18 or over.”

A mate of mine denied being addicted to brake fluid. He reckoned he could stop any time.

Just got back from my mate’s funeral. He died after being hit on the head with a tennis ball. It was a lovely service.

Thank you Paul, for the little giggles this week.

Nearly there

Things, they are a changing.

Beavering away in the background with the aid of my toyboys. I struggle but am learning new skills. They have great patience with me. Yet the child in me wants the wheels of action to move faster, like an aircraft running out of runway!

Soon, very soon, all will become clear.

UPDATE: By ‘beavering away’ I mean working for a long time at a project. A project I could not manage on my own, without the help & talents of my long-time toyboys

A Widow Woman’s Dream

“The world is in perpetual motion, and we must invent the things of tomorrow. One must go before others, be determined and exacting, and let your intelligence direct your life. Act with audacity.” *

In our world of today, we are told: Entrepreneurship for women is controlled by a glass ceiling. Yet the quotation above was heard long before the term ‘glass ceiling’ was invented!

The author born in 1777 was Barbe-Nicole Ponsardin, only child of an affluent textile industrialist in Reims, France. In 1798, when she was 21 years old, Barbe-Nicole married the boy next door: Francois Clicquot, only son of Phillipe Clicquot.

A short six years later, Francois fell suddenly ill with a fever and died, leaving her a single mother and a widow.

The French word for widow is ‘veuve’

Barbe-Nicole became Veuve Clicquot.

Sound familiar? Of course it is. You have heard of it before:

Veuve Clicquot label

Veuve Clicquot label

* The words were written by Barbe-Nicole Clicquot to her granddaughter, in a letter to be found in the book titled: The Widow Clicquot By Tilar J. Mazzeo.

It tells the Story of a Champagne Empire and the Woman Who Ruled It.