Photographing the Alphabet ~ U

U – Under

Helen & Mike under the umbrella roof of the Pavillion

Helen & Mike under the umbrella roof of the Pavillion

Under the Pavillion in the Large Parterre at Antrim Castle Gardens.

Helen & Mike Reshkin are blogging & twitter friends who were on holiday in Ireland from Chicago, in June/July this year. They found a day to spend with me, but unfortunately it was a rather well washed with rain.

We began our adventure at Lough Neagh, alas, the sky was so low we were hardly able to see beyond our noses. 😦 I didn’t bother to get out of the car. We moved on to Clotworthy House.

Wet day visitors with the wolfhound at Clotworthy House

Wet day visitors with the wolfhound at Clotworthy House

It is amazing how the place has improved over the past four years.

Before the renovations

Before the renovations

A brighter day at the end of May 2009.

Capturing the scene

Capturing the scene

Capturing the moment in the quiet maze of pathways.

We were not alone. The Heron kept a beady on us.

We were not alone. The Heron kept a beady on us.

Helen & Mike, I enjoyed sharing one of my favourite places with you. Thanking you for making time to spend with me.

A very special day

It was time for lunch. Not just any old lunch, but a catch up with Brian – He who gave me the handle Grannymar. Calendars were checked. Dates discussed, arranged, postponed and finally organised for the week before he returned to ‘La Heredia’. I knew I would be going to Dublin, so decided to travel a few days early and have our lunch there instead of Belfast.

I asked if he knew where the Hungry tree was, it was on my list to photograph.

He did. One thing led to another and before I knew it lunch became a day of adventure for me.

I was collected at 11 am and traveled in style to see the Hungry tree.

The hungry tree

The hungry tree

The seat has been there so long, the tree has grown over the back of it.

Hungry tree from another angle

Hungry tree from another angle

We then continued up the drive to the front door of our next port of call…

The Honorable Society of King’s Inns

The Honorable Society of King’s Inns

The Honorable Society of King’s Inns is the oldest institution of legal education in Ireland. The Honorable Society of King’s Inns comprises benchers, barristers and students. The benchers include all the judges of the Supreme and High Courts and a number of elected barristers.

Gateway to my adventure

Gateway to my adventure

It was founded in 1541 during the reign of Henry VIII, who had passed the Act for confiscation of Religious Houses in 1539, and granted the Society the lands and properties on which the Four Courts now stand but which were then occupied by a Dominican monastery.

The Lobby

The Lobby

When the Four Courts were built in the 1790s, King’s Inns moved to Constitution Hill and the benchers commissioned James Gandon to design their present property, the headquarters of the Benchers and the School of Law. The primary focus of the school is the training of barristers.

Looking up from the window

Looking up from the window

In the Middle Ages, the need for apprentice lawyers to learn about common law led to the founding of hostels where they could live and study. The Inns of Court were places where the students were provided with accommodation, meals and tuition. Up to 1800 the buildings at Inns Quay provided all that was needed for practice at the bar. There were chambers where barristers lived and worked, a hall for eating and drinking, a library for research, a chapel for prayer and gardens for recreation. Things changed somewhat with the move to Constitution Hill. Chambers and a chapel were to have been built but the plans were never executed. However, many of the 17th century traditions remain or are co-mingled with 21st century developments.

The Dining Hall

The Dining Hall

The formal records of King’s Inns (the “Black Book”) date from 1607. Initially a voluntary society but by 1634 membership had become compulsory for barristers wishing to practise in the courts.

Nolumus Mutari

Nolumus Mutari

The fireplace in the dining hall with the King’s Inns seal. An open book and the motto Nolumus Mutari which is commonly translated as ‘we do not wish to be changed’. It should be read and understood as the determination by the bench and the bar that the law will be applied without fear or favour and will not bend to suit interests of those with power and influence.

Some of the paintings in the dining hall

Some of the paintings in the dining hall

After the Williamite wars of the 1690s catholics were effectively excluded from the legal profession by the penal laws. This exclusion lasted for a century until the Catholic Relief Act of 1792 when catholics were allowed to practise at the outer Bar.

The gong to announce dinner

The gong to announce dinner

King’s Inns did not possess a library until in 1787 but on the death of Mr. Justice Robinson, his law books (at that time valued at £700) were bought by the Society.

The reading room

The reading room

The present library building was erected between 1826 and 1830, to a design by Frederick Darley. The Library has three stories over a basement and was originally seven bays wide. In 1892 an annexe was added at the north-west end.

View of the gallery

View of the gallery

A Copyright Act of 1710 required that printers give a copy of each book published to various university libraries in England and Scotland. During the reign of George III, in a further Copyright Act (1801), the libraries of Trinity College, Dublin and of King’s Inns were added to the list. In 1836 the provisions of the act were withdrawn.

Detail of the plasterwork

Detail of the plasterwork

The present library building was completed in 1830 and houses some 100,000 volumes including those which formed the original collection, purchased in 1787.

Not your usual light reading

Not your usual light reading

Today the library contains over 110,000 volumes, about half of which have a legal content, the remainder being concerned with a wide variety of non-legal subjects.

Nolumus Mutari

well read weighty words

The general collection contains works on art, history, the classics, literature, biography and numerous other subjects. Of particular note are the books printed before 1501, parliamentary papers, Encumbered Estates Court Rentals, pamphlets and manuscripts.

Throwing light on the subject

Throwing light on the subject

While in the past the Society sought to create a comprehensive general library, the emphasis in recent years has been on developing the legal collection. The legal collection contains all of the Irish and most of the English textbooks along with statutes, reports of cases, digests and legal periodicals. European, Commonwealth and American Law are well represented and amongst the older legal material are fine collections of trials, Irish appeals to the House of Lords, nominate reports, Roman law and canon law.

I walked all the way down and. up again, but didn't  count them.

I walked all the way down and. up again, but didn’t count them.

We went all the way down stairs to where we found bound copies of The  Times from long before I or my parents were born.

Bound copies of The Times newspapers

Bound copies of The Times newspapers

I was privileged to be allowed into the inner sanctum of the bencher’s room. A place for the learned gentlemen to unwind and discuss the matters of the day.

Inner sanctum for the benchers

Inner sanctum for the benchers

Some decorative details:

decorative ceiling detail

decorative ceiling detail

ceiling light

ceiling light

Ceiling rose

Ceiling rose

One surprise was a garderobe:

a garderobe

a garderobe

A modern soap dish, toilet roll & loo brush are evidence to the fact it was still in use today. I have to say I love the towel holder.

classy towel holder

classy towel holder

That towel holder looks like a heavy door knocker. I like it!

The whole visit was a wonderful experience and I must say a special thanks to David, who with Brian made the visit so memorable.

Gallery 1

Gallery 2

gallery 3 Miscellaneous selection of photos:

We did go and have a late lunch at Aqua in Howth. The company, the food and the view were all fantastic. A pet day!

California, DNA and 8,427 panes of glass

All part of a morning spent at the National Botanic Gardens of Ireland.

National botanic gardens of Ireland (1)

National botanic gardens of Ireland (1)

In the distance you can see a recreation of a round tower to honour Daniel O’Connell, “the Liberator”, in Glasnevin Cemetry. It was built to the colossal height of 171 feet, and before you ask… I’ll not be climbing up for an aerial view of the dead centre of Dublin! 😛

Next door neighbours - Glasnevin Cemetery

Next door neighbours – Glasnevin Cemetery

The gardens are next door neighbours and a new entrance is being erected between the two.

The Taxodiaceae Sequeiadendron giganteum, native of California

The Taxodiaceae Sequeiadendron giganteum, native of California

The Taxodiaceae Sequeiadendron giganteum, native of California rather dwarfed the Curvilinear Glasshouse.

The Curvilinear Glasshouse

The Curvilinear Glasshouses

The curvilinear glasshouse was designed by Dublin ironmaster, Richard Turner in 1843.

Curved panes of glass

Curved panes of glass

The work was completed and opened in 1849. It was extended in 1869.

One end of the Curvilinear Glasshouse

Great Palm House

A major restoration began in 1992 and was completed with all 8,427 panes of glass in place, in time for the bicentenary of the founding of the gardens.

curved lines from the inside

curved lines from the inside

After a dander along several pathways I came across this:

?What is Life? sculpture

‘What is Life’ sculpture

‘What is Life’
Sculptor ~ Charles Jencks

‘What is Life’ was commissioned by Professors John Atkins of University College Cork and David McConnell of Trinity College Dublin as a public celebration of Science in Ireland and to specifically celebrate the 60th anniversary of the discovery of The Double Helix by Watson and his colleague Francis Crick in April 1953.

Side view

Side view

The Sculptor, Charles Jencks, designs landscapes and sculpture and writes on cosmogenic art.

The meaning in words

The meaning in words

It represents for the first time in sculpture anywhere the many extraordinary new revelations made in the last 30 years about the novel roles of RNA in living organisms.

Finally a plaque I found on the steps in one of the glasshouses:

Inspiration

Inspiration

Ludwig Wittgenstein
(1889 – 1951)
Viennese Philosopher

Stayed in Dublin in the winter of 1948-1949
and liked to sit and write at these steps

St. Annes Park

St. Anne’s Park is an estate of nearly 306 acres in the Clontarf/Raheny area, on the north side of Dublin. Brothers Arthur and Benjamin Lee Guinness (sons of Uncle Arthur, the man who gave us the black stuff!), built up and called the estate St. Anne’s after the Holy Well of the same name on the lands.

St Anne's Park, Clontarf. Who would believe this was the site of a great battle in 1014?

St Anne’s Park, Clontarf. Who would believe this was the site of a great battle in 1014?

In 1932 the estate was sold to Dublin Corporation and still remains in their hands.

St Anne's Park_3

In December 1943, the main residence of St. Anne’s “The Mansion” was gutted by a fire and the ruins demolished in 1968. In the meantime, just over 200 acres of the estate were developed for public housing with the central most attractive portion comprising about 270 acres retained as parkland.

St Anne's Park_5

The park is intensively used by the public through its 35 playing pitches, 18 hard-surfaced tennis courts, 4 Boules courts and a par-3 golf course. The park also has a remote-controlled model car track, and a dedicated ‘Dog Park’ beside the track, where dogs may be let off lead at all other times.

Each year, an annual Rose Festival is held in the Park on the 3rd weekend of July.

A modern addition.  I have no details of the sculptor or title of the piece.

A modern addition. I have no details of the sculptor or title of the piece.

In the Central Nurseries, located behind the Clocktower Gardens, over 600,000 seasonal bedding plants are produced annually for the city’s parks. The wooden planters to be seen on the Liffey Boardwalk and elsewhere throughout the city, along with the tiered floral planters, are also produced & maintained within the Nursery.

Photo is the property of Dublin City Council.

Photo is the property of Dublin City Council.

The Red Stables designed by George Coppinger Ashlin, have been refurbished and now provide an Arts Centre, Restaurant & a Saturday Farmers Market.

On our way to the Farmer's Market.

On our way to the Farmer’s Market.

The avenue leading to the market.

This cut down tree stump fascinated me.

This cut down tree stump fascinated me.

Another view of the cut down tree stump, remember the roots are still in the ground.

side view of the tree stump

side view of the tree stump

…. and from the front:

Front view shows a seat!

Front view shows a seat!

Finally a well seasoned stump seat:

well seasoned seat

Click on any thumbnail in the gallery below for greater detail.

Little Museum of Dublin

The Little Museum of Dublin can be found in a beautiful Georgian townhouse at No. 15 St Stephen’s Green, Dublin not far from Grafton Street. It is a non-profit company and depends on the generosity of the public to survive.

The Little Museum of Dublin

First floor at The Little Museum of Dublin courtesy of the museum.

It tells the story of Dublin in the 20th Century. Launched in April 2011 with a public appeal for historic objects with a connection to Dublin during that time. The response to that appeal reflects the generosity of the Irish public, as well as the vision of the patrons in Dublin City Council.

The ground floor covers Emigration to America

The ground floor covers Emigration to America

There are now over 5,000 artefacts in the collection, as well as three floors of exhibition space and a café in the basement. The goal is not to sell an ideology but simply to remember the past.

The story of three women

The story of three women

The Little Museum was recently described as “Dublin’s best museum experience” by the Irish Times and they have been nominated for the European Museum of the Year Awards.

Did you use an old Royal

Did you use an old Royal

The collection includes art, photography, advertising, letters, postcards, objects and ephemera relating to cultural, social and political life in Dublin between the years 1900 and 2000.

Finlater’s Bicycle for delivering the orders

Finlater’s Bicycle for delivering the orders

The collection is mostly comprised of donations and loans from the people of Dublin. Somehow I had difficulty with taking photos, so much of the items were familiar from my young life.

Please note: the museum is on the first floor of a Georgian building. Assistance is available for visitors with wheelchairs.

A Darting Day.

The other day I decided to try as many of the modes of public transport available to me in Dublin.

 dublin area

Leaving Elly & George’s house, I hopped on the local bus  to town (Dublin), alighting at Heuston Train Station. From there I jumped on a Luas tram to Connolly Train Station, where I boarded the Dublin Area Rapid Transit (DART), that runs from Howth & Malahide on the north of Dublin bay right to Bray and on under Bray Head to Greystones in Co Wicklow.

I chose the southerly direction and a destination of Greystones.  It has been over almost half a century. since I visited Greystones, back then it was a very sleepy village.

Plenty of overhead cables at this end of the street

Plenty of overhead cables at this end of the street

Although expansion has taken place in Greystones and the arrival of the ‘Dart’, turned it into a commuter town.

The other end of the street. Note the difference when the cables are underground

The other end of the street. Note the difference when the cables are underground

The place still holds on the village feeling with a wonderful selection of interesting restaurants and well looked after shops and boutiques.

Mrs Robinsons_1

Mrs Robinsons Restaurant

Mrs Robinson believes in looking after her outdoor customers.
Mrs Robinson believes in looking after her outdoor customers.

I ambled my way about the streets and sat for a coffee at the Happy Pear  It was busy, but welcoming and the coffee was good. I sat outside and ‘people watched’.

I found this small strand from the road, but it was a long climb down

I found this small strand from the road, but it was a long climb down

Then it was time to seek out the beach of soft coarse sand.

Soft sand, but no bright sun so far today

Soft sand, but no bright sun so far today

The sky was clearing and the sun appearing…

I see the sea!

I see the sea!

When I had my fill, I worked my way back to the Dart Station, to head back towards town. Realising that I had never travelled all the way round Dublin Bay in one go, I got my ticket to take me to Howth.

End of the line at Howth Dart Station

End of the line at Howth Dart Station

Howth was really the end of the line. I have been to Howth on many occasions, so did not dally this time.

I took the Dart back to Connelly Station, from there the Luas to Heuston Station and this time a train from Heuston to Adamstown.

The fresh sea air, had sharpened my appitite and the aroma of good cooking was very welcome smell. Elly & George produced aperitifs and nibbles to snack on, as I shared my adventure and we waited for dinner.

So I was on a bus, tram, Dart and train, now that leaves boats and planes for another day!

Doh-Ray-Mee

‘Doh-Ray-Mee’ cottages, Raheny, Dublin.

‘Doh-Ray-Mee’ cottages, Raheny, Dublin.

The ‘Doh-Ray-Mee’ cottages in Raheny, were built around 1790 by Samuel Dick. He was a very successful Linen Merchant, who lived in Violet Hill, which later became known as Edenmore House and is known today as St. Joseph’s Hospital. He built the cottages for men who worked on his estate.

Samuel Dick was a director of Bank of Ireland and he held the top job as Governor from 1797 to 1799. He was also a director of the Hibernian Insurance Company and was a trustee of the Malahide Turnpike Road, which controlled the repairing of the Malahide, Howth and Clontarf Roads.

They are called ‘Doh-Ray-Mee’ cottages because there are eight cottages all together, just as there are eight notes on the musical scale. Their other name is ‘crescent cottages’ because they are built in a semi-circle. They are among the oldest buildings in Raheny.

Samuel Dick also built a school on Main Street beside the old graveyard of St Assam’s. It became known as ‘Dick’s Charity School’ because it was intended for ‘poor children of all persuasions’.

When Samuel Dick died in 1802, he left the Crescent Cottages in Raheny village to the people who looked after the school, so that the rent from Crescent Cottages could be used to pay the salary of the school’s teacher. At that time the government did not pay teachers or fund schools.

Over time the cottages fell into disrepair and by 1879 were in such a poor state that Lord Ardilaun, the owner of St Anne’s estate, paid £375 to improve them all.

The cottage closest to the Station House pub was once the village post office. The cottages have remained almost unchanged since they were built in the eighteenth century and people still live in them today.

A taste of my Dublin Week

Sheep shade

Sheep shade

Monday sun and rising...

Monday sun and rising…

Adventure time

By the time I get to Phoenix Dublin I’ll be roasted!

Never mind the flags, have the hugs ready!

I know these guys will be waiting for me!

I am sure there will be a few warm blooded Toyboys too!

Another Granny does her thing

The title is not mine, it was suggested.

The photos were not taken by me, but I promised them back at the beginning of June.

Sure you know what a brazen hussy I am…. And the same guy was involved in that story too.

You might remember, I wrote about having a call from my friend Brian, while he was out walking one morning. He noticed something outside a house that made him think of me, so he phoned. Although it was a road he knew well and travelled almost daily when at home, he rarely passed there on foot. The road is narrow and with a lot of traffic so stopping in the car is not an option.

So what did he see…..

What a wonderful way to re-purpose those books that you are finished with and perhaps discover a few treasures that others leave outside your door!

The final photograph is the view of Dublin Bay from behind the book box, on a grey day. Taken from Baldoyle, it is looking southward.

Dublin Bay, on the east coast of Ireland, is curved like open arms ready to give a great big hug to all who visit! The bay is about 10 kilometres wide and stretches from Howth Head in the north to Dalkey Point in the south.

 Photo credit: Bronwen Maher's Dublin Bay

Photo credit:
Bronwen Maher’s Dublin Bay

Thank you Brian, for the photos!