Tomorrow

“Too many times we stand aside and let the waters slip away, till what we put off till tomorrow has now become today. So don’t you sit upon the shoreline and say you’re satisfied. Choose to chance the rapids and dare to dance the tide.”

I have no idea who said it, I only wish I had thought of it first.

It was my turn to set the gang cogitating with the topic Tomorrow, so when they are ready, why not join in with our regular choir of The Old Fossil, Ramana, Delirious, Maxi, Shackman speaks, Ashok, Maria/Gaelikaa, Maria SilverFox, Padmum, Blackwatertown, Will Knott & Rohit as we sing….

The sun’ll come out, tomorrow,
Bet your bottom dollar, that tomorrow,
There’ll be sun,

~ From the musical “Annie”

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17 thoughts on “Tomorrow

  1. “Worry does not empty tomorrow of its sorrow. It empties today of its strength.” – Corrie Ten Boom (a Dutch Christian who helped many Jews escape the Holocaust)

  2. Wimpy is the great champion of tomorrow. “I’ll gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today!”

  3. Great quote! I do tend to venture out in to the rapids more frequently than my friends. But I also still tend to think a lot about what tomorrow will bring

    • Over the years I have watched so many people spend time wondering and planning for a future that never came, forgetting that life is not a dress rehearsal, but a one way ticket.

  4. Great topic, I’ve composed a poem in honour of it. Why quote others when you canmake a quotable statement yourself.

    • Maria, apologies if my post was not up to standard this week, but although yesterday (Friday) was a rather complicated day, I didn’t want to miss the deadline. I did read your poem, with talent like that you should be posting with us every week!

  5. “Old friend, come on and let’s not fret
    about tomorrow’s grief today;
    let’s spend this instant’s cash in hand–
    because tomorrow when we pass
    away from this decrepit bar
    we’ll be laid out with those who left
    it seven thousand years ago.”

    Translated by Juan Cole
    from Omar Khayyam’s Rubaiyat.

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